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Displaced Scientists Strive to Restart Professional Lives in New Lands

By Toni Feder

For four displaced scientists from Syria and Yemen, IIE-SRF fellowships were a means to ensuring their security and restarting their careers. A new publication in Physics Today tracks the journeys of these four IIE-SRF scholars, representing the record number of scientists who have had to flee their home countries during this unprecedented global migration crisis. 

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Interview with IIE-SRF Scholar Mustafa Bahran in Physics Today

By Toni Feder

This full-length interview with IIE-SRF scholar Mustafa Bahran of Yemen, a professor of nuclear physics, follows his education, career development, and journey to escape conflicted Yemen. Despite his many accomplishments, Dr. Bahran fled his home country to ensure his and his family's safety, and also continue his scientific work -- without a certain future. 

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A New Film Focuses on 4 Arab Researchers’ Lives in Exile

By Tarek Abd El-Galil

Featuring the stories of four Arab refugee scientists, "Science in Exile" gives voice to the struggles refugees face when escaping war and searching for new opportunities in academia. The documentary was premiered at IIE-SRF's Forum on March 9, 2018 at the IIE Headquarters in New York City. The trailer is included in this article by Al-Fanar Media.

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Science, Interrupted

By Jennifer Hattam

War, conflict, and strife have uprooted researchers around the world. When these individuals are displaced, the fate of their life's work and their wealth of knowledge are also at risk. Through the stories of scholars from the Middle East and Eastern Europe, Discover's Jennifer Hattam explores the complex issues surrounding interrupted scholarship. The full text of this article is available only to Discover magazine subscribers. 

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Joshua McKeown Mentors Physician-Educator from Myanmar

 
As part of an IIE program called "Connecting with the World," Dr. Joshua McKeown, director of SUNY Oswego's Office of International Education and Programs, mentors physician, educator, and IIE-SRF alumnus from Myanmar, Dr. Myint Oo. The program is dedicated to helping Myanmar professionals acquire the foundational knowledge needed to develop and manage an international officein their home country.
 
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Refugee Scientists Under the Spotlight

By Andy Exrtance

Thousands of people are forced to flee war-torn regions every year, but the struggles of scientists who have to leave their homeland often goes under the radar. IIE-SRF is just one of many initiatives around the world helping these scientists to continue their work in safety.

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Safe Harbor

By Wyatt Marshall

Proto magazine interviewed IIE's President and CEO Allan Goodman, who oversaw the creation of IIE-SRF in 2002. The interview addresses the dangers scholars face today, how the organization connects with those in need, and ways in which institutions can help. 

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She May Be the Most Unstoppable Scientist in the World

By Michaeleen Doucleff

Forced to flee her native Yemen, IIE-SRF scholar Eqbal Dauqan conitinues to break boundaries as a highly accomplished female scientist. NPR shares more on her incredible journey.

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Refugee Scientists: The Way Forward

By Sean Treacy and Edward W. Lempinen

Fleeing conflict and war, refugee scientists often arrive in their new countries unrecognized and unemployed. A workshop co-organized by The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS) has produced a broad set of recommendations for supporting them.

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The Scientists Who Had to Start Over: 'Five Years of my Career Have Been Wiped Out'

By Giovanni Ortolani

Many displaced academics and scientists aren't able to reach their full potential in their fields due to a lack of resources for threatened scholars. The Guardian explores the reasons why, with two IIE-SRF scholars offering their perspective. 

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